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Interview

An Interview with Joey Klein, Founder and CEO of Inner Matrix Systems

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Joey Klein Inner Matrix Systems interview

Joey Klein is the founder and CEO of Inner Matrix Systems, a personal mastery training system for high achievers. He is the author of “The Inner Matrix: Leveraging the Art & Science of Personal Mastery to Create Real Life Results.” He has been interviewed by Self Magazine, INC.com, Yahoo Finance and NBC. Klein has coached leaders from some of the world’s top companies, including IBM, Coca Cola and the World Health Organization.

We recently got the opportunity to interview Joey.

Joey, Thank you for talking with us. For someone who helps others achieve their personal best, every single day must be a satisfying day. However, tell me about your best days at work.

The best days at work are when I get to execute my art — personal development and transformational work — and make a difference in people’s lives, whether working one-on-one with people or with an audience. I like doing what I can to be able to see lives change. Those are definitely my best days.

Your clients come from different backgrounds and are generally high achievers. In your view, who are high achievers? Also, What does your training system focus on?

Our clients are high achievers, looking to get an edge inside what they do. A high achiever is anyone looking to do what they do in the best way they can, whether that’s an entrepreneur running a large organization, or a mom or dad wanting to master parenting in a particular way, and everything in between, from pro athletes to artists.

Our training system focuses on developing what drives our choices, decisions, and actions, which are our internal mechanisms, our emotional intelligence, and our thought strategies, etc. We train people to manage their inner game to perform at the level they want to achieve.

Helping others achieve their goals must be a great reward in itself. However, what was your biggest “aha” moment?

My biggest “aha” moment was when, after years of training people, I realized I couldn’t train people the same way I was trained. When I studied with my mentors, it was extremely intense. They were very direct and, what I would call, extreme high intensity. That level of intensity trained a resilience and capacity that supported me to create extraordinary outcomes for myself. When I started training people at the request of my mentors, I brought that same high level of intensity and expectations to the space. And when people opted out of training with me, I was dumbfounded. I didn’t understand why they didn’t show up for the training that would lead to the outcome they had named for themselves.

That type of training does not scale well. My mentors were training only a few people at a time at that level of intensity. It never occurred to me that there were so few of us because we were the only ones willing to show up for that type of training. I was trying to take the same intense regimen that worked in a small group of people willing to be up to it and have it work for hundreds of people at a time. And when you’re trying to build a company in that space — when you have a 10% retention reality — that’s not great. It doesn’t work out. What I realized is, although many of us are driven to be high achievers who want a better life, not everyone has the desire to be trained in an intense way.  I learned to meet people where they are at and to give them the next step based on wherever they are in their own development. It was a game-changer.

This new way of training is much more enjoyable for me. I realized that few people are ready and willing for the type of training I had. But if you meet people where they are and nudge them along the way, they often learn how to drive at that all-out intensity.

What has been the most important part of your journey?

The most important part of my journey has been learning the difference between developing a high-capacity heart — in other words, cultivating my love of training people by developing their capacities — and the idea that this would easily translate to professional success.

I love training people and supporting them to develop themselves to create what they choose for themselves. However, this on its own does not create a business. Early on, as I developed my training system, I started studying business and realized I needed to develop a high level of capacity and aptitude for it if I really wanted to change lives and do what I love doing at scale. To have a large impact and influence the lives of thousands of people, there needs to be a structure in place.

The skillset and the aptitude necessary to build out business structures, team cultures, and operational systems that can deliver a product or a service at scale is the thing that makes impact possible. Taking on an intensive study of business, entrepreneurship, sales, marketing, and all of the logistics that make a business run, work, and grow is what makes the impact that we have today possible. Without that, we could still have an impact, but it wouldn’t be as big as what we’re after. And while there’s nothing wrong with an intimate impact, you’re only influencing the lives of 50 or 100 people as opposed to thousands or millions.

The training industry has seen a surge in so-called ‘experts’. But not everyone provides quality training. In that context, what risks is your company facing?

There’s a great documentary out on Netflix right now called the Social Dilemma, which talks about how people don’t know what real information is anymore. Often, it’s “fake news,” so to speak. The internet gives us more access to each other than we’ve ever had before. But, because anybody can engage these platforms or put information out on them, the public is having a harder and harder time distinguishing between a quality product or service as opposed to a non-quality product or service.

When it comes to the arena that we play in, which is training emotional intelligence and thought strategy techniques, we are in the space of optimizing human performance from an internal reality. There are so many people inside the coaching or “training industry” who present well but simply do not know what they’re doing. They may have taken a weekend course to learn skills to train or coach someone, but they have never actually executed with real people or have real outcomes to leverage. Competing with this — making the distinction of how we’re qualified and why we’re different from this inundation of people simply hanging their shingle out and calling themselves personal development experts — is one of the biggest challenges that we constantly work with. We always invite our clients to engage “healthy skepticism” when engaging our training or any others. Engage the training and really lean in, and if you are able to see outcomes that you’ve named for yourself begin to happen, then continue.  

We’re not the only great training company out there; there are others. But there are many out there who are not only going to miss the mark but are probably going to cause negative effects as opposed to positive ones. The unique part about IMS is that we’re a proven training system that is not reliant on a one-off experience or individual but a process designed to create self-reliance.

What would you do with unlimited resources?

There are two things I would do. Number one, I would look to market at scale. Many companies that win out don’t win because they have the best product or service out there. They win out because they’re in front of everybody regularly, and they have the resources to do that. There are lots of fast food companies that aren’t in existence today because they make quality food; they exist because they’re in front of everybody. Their marketing is really present. So, letting everybody know that we’re simply available would be a game-changer.

The second thing, because I don’t only want to make money — although that needs to be what every business does — I would put those resources towards education and support to anyone willing to engage. I think everybody deserves to have access to education and developmental support if they’re willing to engage it. Many people in the world would love to have access to education and training to develop themselves to live a better life, but they simply don’t have access to it.

When was the last time you totally lost yourself in doing something?

I think this is the way I strive to live every day. If I’m at work and we’re in a strategy session, I lose myself in it. I don’t know what time it is. Thirty minutes could go by, or three hours could go by. I regularly have to have somebody let me know it’s time to go on to the next thing because I’m fully engaged with whatever I’m doing. If I’m surfing in the ocean, nothing else exists. Because nothing else can exist. I love to do activities where it demands that I am not anywhere else because I find that’s where I find the greatest fulfillment. I think we tend to find the greatest fulfillment when we are fully present with what we’re doing.

Most of the discomfort and suffering that we experience is often related to being somewhere else. We are not present with life as it’s happening right in front of us. We’re usually focused on the past or focused on the future. Either on something that we don’t want to happen or avoiding something that has happened and wishing that we had something that isn’t there anymore. I think I strive to live that way where I lose myself in whatever I’m doing at the time.

Apart from training individuals and groups realize their true potential, what else do you love?

My favorite thing is being in nature. That can be skiing in the winter, mountain biking in the summer, and hiking in the woods. Anything active going on in nature, I’m all in. And making time to be with my girlfriend is also on top of the list. She loves going to nice restaurants, or even Netflix at home is always great.

How do you feel you make a difference in the world?

The biggest way I make a difference is by giving people access to naming the life they want to live as opposed to the life they feel is available for them. Giving people access to the belief and the ability to name the life they want, but then following that up with how to bridge the gap from where they are in life to where they want to go. That, in my mind, is the transformational journey.

Creating a paradigm shift is the way I think we create the biggest service. We offer the greatest benefit to people by showing them how to create a paradigm shift where we can look at our reality half a degree differently. That gives us the ability to see what’s necessary within ourselves and our environment and to go from where we are to where we’d like to go. Often, the answers are right in front of us; we have the information within us. It’s usually a small adjustment but a necessary one that needs to happen to change perspective, giving us access to possibility.

Carolin Petterson is a Business Lady/Content Marketer and contributor for number of high-class business and marketing websites.

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Interview

An Interview with Jennifer Miree Cope

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Described as thorough and organized by her closest associates, Jennifer Miree Cope graduated from Vanderbilt University in 1985 with a degree in Electrical Engineering.

Jennifer has a deep-seated passion for several non-profit organizations. Especially with the Susan G. Komen Foundation and The O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, which has treated several of her close friends and family members.

Jennifer Miree Cope’s respect for the generosity of nonprofits inspired her to become a volunteer. Currently, she is involved with several charities started by Independent Presbyterian Church in Birmingham, Alabama: STAIR tutoring, the Children’s Fresh Air Farm, and Holiday House. 

Jennifer’s husband, Pat Cope, is the founder of Cope Private Wealth — a prestigious financial planning firm. When not relaxing with her husband and two sons in Mountain Brook, Jennifer can often be found exercising, walking her dog, or hiking in the mountains of North Carolina.

Jennifer, thank you for doing this. Tell me about your best and worst days at work. 

My worst days are the days when we’re busy. You know those days when customers are calling, texting, emailing from early in the morning to late at night. (I can’t help it that it rained that day.) But one of my best days was when we had three very happy clients, two of whom brought me wine!

What are the projects that you most enjoy working on?

Landscaping an empty or nearly empty lot.  It’s just like an artist starting with a blank canvas.

What was your biggest ‘a-ha’ moment?

My biggest eureka moment was when I realized that technical drawings such as landscape plans can often be just as pretty as art.

What has been the most important part of your professional journey?

That’s a simple answer. It would have to be time management. There’s simply no way to succeed without it. And I start managing my time well from the beginning – it really starts the minute I wake up in the morning.

What risks is your company facing? 

With the economy doing poorly and inflation on the rise, people can always stop landscaping. That’s really the biggest issue here. It is unfortunately a luxury and not a necessity.

What would you do with unlimited resources?

That’s a tough one! I mean, to be honest, there are a lot of things that I would do with unlimited money, and I imagine that’s the same for everyone else too.

But there is one thing that I would prioritize if I had unlimited money: First, I would try to use it to find a cure for cancer. Both of my sisters, my mom, my aunt, and my husband all had cancer. My two sisters died from it. It’s a nasty disease and we need to dedicate more of our resources to fighting against it.

When was the last time you totally lost yourself in doing something?

I would have to say it was the last time I made a needlepoint belt for one of my sons. It can be very easy to find yourself in the zone when you’re engaged in that.

What do you do when you’re not at work?

Yeah, well for exercise, you can usually find me playing golf, doing pilates, or yoga. I often enjoy going out to eat or attending sporting events and musical theater. And I can’t forget that one of my favorite things to do is travel — mostly to our place in the North Carolina mountains.

How do you feel you make a difference in the world?

For me, the number one way to make a difference is tutoring the underprivileged. I have done a lot with STAIR, and I am very proud of that work.

 

 

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Interview

In this interview, Raquel Ureña talks about the second season of ‘NY Never Sleeps’

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New York Never Sleeps

Raquel Ureña is a filmmaker and the Founder of NYC Latin Media. She has produced over 8 films. To know more about Raquel Ureña, please read our interview with her.

Raquel, It’s a pleasure talking with you again. Much awaited “NY Never Sleeps” will be rolling out its second season pretty soon. How excited are you about this?

I am really excited. Especially because the participants of this second season are super successful women who are truly inspiring. They are great role models.

Would you like to give a sneak peek into the second season for our audience?

These women of Dominican descent all have successful businesses and they all started with nothing, showing us that if you work hard and remain focused, anything is possible. They are all immigrants and today, have many luxuries due to their hard work. Besides seeing the lifestyles of these women, we will also be seeing a lot of fashionable and trendy, and exclusive places in New York.

When will you start filming?

We will start filming in May and have many plans and exclusive events that we will be attending. We will be showing exclusive restaurants and places that people need to see in NY.

On which platforms, will the second season be available? Also, how many episodes will be there in the second season

There are 13 episodes in the second season and it will be airing on Digital 15 and Telemicro Internacional which is the biggest TV platform in the Dominican Republic. Telemicro Internacional is seen in the US through Comcast cable. The show will be airing towards the end of September. We will be filming all summer.

What are your views on the current status of women in entrepreneurship? especially in the Latina community?

New York is a difficult place to live in and very expensive but these women have proven that even with a humble beginning and hard work, it is possible to get ahead in life.

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Interview

An Interview with Ali LeMille, Career Coach and Founder of The Job Forge

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Ali LeMille

Ali LeMille is the founder of The Job Forge. Ali has successfully helped a large number of companies find the right set of employees. She has also helped over 70 individuals land their dream jobs.

Ali, Thank you so much for talking with us. Your experience with recruitment is pretty vast. You have also worked with some of the biggest names, helping them in recruitment. Tell us more about your past experience.

I had a rather unusual introduction into the recruiting world. I had started as a hiring manager for local “Mom & Pop” shops in my hometown. The connections I made in the area high schools and colleges are what I was able to tap to quickly fix the staffing situation at the theme park I was brought into with Kodak. I moved into a year-round role and worked between New York, New Jersey, and other locations worldwide.

The companies I worked with were some of the most recognizable brands in the world! The last project I worked on was staffing for the Disney Premiere of The Princess and The Frog in Manhattan. It was in a refurbished nightclub where guests could explore a “bayou” playground, learn to draw from actual Disney animators, and see authentic movie props. It was a fantastic opportunity, and I still maintain close connections with the people I worked with during that time.

I found myself in the healthcare sector after being injured by a patient in the emergency room I had been moonlighting in. This placed me on light duty, where I used my talent acquisition skills to recruit positions for everything from housekeeping to physician assistants.

I then moved into the Non-Profit sector with AmeriCorps and their Reading Partners Program. There I maintained a staff of roughly 500 volunteer tutors. After that, I went into Insurance/Healthcare once again.


Based on your experience, what are some of the things a recruiter looks for in a candidate?

Recruiters worth their salt will be looking at your response times, professionalism, and social presence.

Response times give them an idea of your sense of urgency – which is a massive deal for most positions! Potential employers want to know if you’re going to be a great communicator or if you’re willing to let things go for a minute.

Professionalism comes in how you respond: your grammar, cadence, salutations, and if you’re answering everything they asked or leaving out details they need. A great practice is to run your responses through Grammarly or Hemingway App to catch things you may have missed.

Social Presence is massive, and I’m mainly talking about LinkedIn regarding job hunting. Having a fully optimized LinkedIn profile gives you an enormous edge because it’s social proof that you are who you say you are in your career experience. I’ve seen great resumes hit the trash because the candidate didn’t exist anywhere but on their paper resume.

How and when did you come up with the idea of The Job Forge?

When the pandemic hit, I knew many people who joined the mass resignation and began job hunting. People looking to move their careers into a remote situation quickly realized everyone else had the same idea. My phone started blowing up with questions about what “contract to hire” meant and how to update their resumes quickly. I took care of everyone close to me and then some! I wanted to make this service available to anyone else feeling stuck, so I created The Job Forge. I have the different comprehensive packages on my site, but also some basic gigs on Fiverr as well. I wanted to make it as accessible as possible for as many people as possible.

According to you, what are some of the things that career coaches often miss out on?

That clients don’t have to be some industry big wig to need some help. I see a lot of coaches gearing their work to major hitters, not understanding that there’s a whole population of mid-level players that are hungry to throw their career into high gear.

I’ve worked with RNs looking to make Charge Nurse, Retail Managers wanting to switch industries completely, recent grads trying to get their foothold and start making bank, and parents returning to the workforce after time away to take care of their littles.  

Whoever needs coaching should have access to it – and that’s my goal. To make Career Coaching accessible and affordable.

How do you address the gaps in the existing recruitment and career consulting services?

The issue I see happening with current recruiting practices is false barriers to entry for many positions. A great example of this is requiring intensive degrees and forcing employees into the office when it’s not necessary.

I recently attended an Equality Summit where the overwhelming response to “What is the number one thing holding your career back?” was employers requiring higher-level degrees for positions that could also be learned through real-world experience. Many people have spent their lives honing their skills, but they are instantly rejected because an advanced degree was not a pathway for them.

My recruiting approach is working with the employer to narrow down the actual needs to do the job – not what looks good on paper. It’s getting them to understand that an applicant can have the most expensive degree in the world and still not know as much as the person who has spent 20+ years in the industry.

And my Career Consulting service falls in line with that philosophy! Degrees are lovely for specific fields but not required for many others. I want to work with my clients regardless of their educational background. Whatever the barriers are, I want to create a plan for them to succeed!

Though every job has a different set of needs, In your experience, what are some of the most common traits recruiters are looking for in candidates?

I touched on a few earlier, but I can tell you a line that recruiters watch closely: Are you finessing your resume or lying about your abilities? There’s a big difference!

It goes without saying that you should never lie on your resume. Saying you have skills you very definitely don’t will not only get you quickly fired but can also get you a blanket industry ban if the community is small enough.

Finessing? That’s fine! And what I mean by that is, let’s say, you went outside your job description and learned new skills because of it. You can put those on your resume! It’s not lying – You did the work and have the abilities you claim to. Or asking your manager if you can change your title on your resume to reflect more accurately what you did under their employment. Then update your resume accordingly. Your resume is meant to reflect your skills and abilities in the best and most truthful way. And if you need help with that, my services are a click away!

Any suggestions you want to give to first-time job seekers?

Job hunting is a numbers game – especially now when there are many open positions and a ton of applicants. Even when you land an interview, keep applying! Nothing is final until you’re signing contracts accepting the job and have an official start date. Focus on your goals and move forward step-by-step. Clean up your social media, flesh out your LinkedIn profile, and revamp your resume and cover letter.

Oh, and please, please, create a professional email—just your name at Gmail or yahoo or whatever platform you use. Anything else is a potential red flag, and you don’t want to have your CV tossed in the trash for something so quickly addressed. Keep your personal email separate and create one specifically for job hunting.

Lastly, a big trend I am seeing is putting pictures of yourself on your resume. In the US and UK, this can actually really hurt your chances of getting an interview. Many companies will toss resumes with applicant pics on them because they don’t want to be seen as biased.

And if you need help with any of this, reach out to me! I’d love to chat!

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